2012 Publication Announcement

The Executive Board, Volume 13, of the Texas Tech Administrative Law Journal has selected the following eight staff editors’ comment for publication in upcoming volumes of the Texas Tech Administrative Law Journal: 

  • “Here We Go Again: Should the Texas Legislature Change the Name and Governance of the Railroad Commission of Texas,” by Taylor Spalla
  • “Pharmaceuticals in Water: The Albatross Around Texas’s Neck,” by Joseph Behnke
  • “Invisible Wounds: What Texas Should be Doing for the Mental Health of its Veterans,” by Marta Hoes
  • “Dying in a Digital Dump: Why Texas Must Improve its Electronics Recycling Efforts,” by Velissa Chapa
  • “Rule 29 or: How the Railroad Commission Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Hydraulic Fracturing,” by Jonathan Groves
  • “Running out of Gas: Why Texas Must Distance Itself Completely from the Chevron Doctrine of Administrative Deference,” by Manuel H. Hernandez
  • “Railroading the Dunes Sagebrush Lizard: Why it is Important to the Oil and Gas Industry that Texas Agencies Handle Conservation Measures,” by Kalin Harvard
  • “They Call it the Hill Country, I Call it Home: Issues in Siting Wind Energy Transmission Lines is Texas,” by Kaitlyn Luck

The Executive Board, Volume 13, of the Texas Tech Administrative Law Journal has also selected the following three staff editors’ comment for publication on the journal’s website:

  • “Sunsetting Big Government: How Amendments To The Texas Sunset Act Can Reduce The Size Of Government And Serve As A Model For The Nation,” by Ry Ellison
  • “Where The “Frac” Did All The Water Go: The Need For Cooperative Administrative Regulation To Effectively Conserve Texas’ Groundwater Resources,” by Philip McLemore
  • “Texas Flexible Permits: Do they allow Texas Refineries an Unfair Advantage or an Economical Way to Meet Emission Requirements?,” by Jordan Surratt